Overcoming Obstacles In Sport

Overcoming Obstacles In Sport

Overcoming Obstacles In Sport

Badminton is a very simple game but one where you really need to learn all the basics in order to play the game well.

Even though badminton is a relatively easy game to learn initially, it can be challenging if you want to play at a decent level. That’s why learning how to hit different shots correctly, practicing proper footwork, and knowing the best strategies for singles and doubles are so important.

In life the greatest challenges come from within us. We create experiences that teach us valuable lessons every day. These lessons shape our future and the person we are destined to become. As much as we determine our own happiness we do so with our failures as well. We can be our biggest advocates or our biggest haters.

At this moment in time I’m absolutely rubbish at badminton. This frustrates me because I love playing the game.

I’ve been trying to GET BETTER. But I kept missing the shuttlecock so many times and thought to myself this is strange I can’t even see the thing. The truth is I couldn’t.

This is the first time I’ve tried to play any sport since my eye operations.

And this is presenting me with a demon to conquer.

With the loss of most of my vision in my right eye it has proven rather difficult to judge the position of the moving shuttle. I now see that learning to play this game at a reasonable level will pose more of a challenge than I expected. This is not to say it can’t be done. And I will do it. I just have to learn to compensate for the lack of vision.

I think this is a great example of something I write about frequently. In life we will always come up against obstacles, and our biggest challenge is whether we meet this head on and do what we have to do to overcome it, or whether we let it knock us down, and force us to quit.

I know my brain will in time train itself to the knowledge of sight in one eye. My right eye will stop trying to take over and my depth perception will slowly but surely improve.

I know that I need to practice and adjust to seeing the whole game play out just in my left eye.

It’s all about depth perception.

True depth perception requires two eyes, however, when one is lost the brain figures out how to use other clues to calculate distance. Although depth perception will never be perfect after losing an eye, it’s amazing how your brain can compensate.

I equally know that this will not be an insurmountable obstacle and before too long my games going to come together. I just have to go through the embarrassment of missing shuttles from time to time, smashing air when the light shines into my eye or losing points because someone is seeing where I’m not, and plays shot intentionally down my blind side. I have no fears or doubts that soon I’ll be winning those games and getting better and better.

But I love to play! I will always have a competitive edge with any sport I play, and although when I mess up, I always have the excuse, “I’m sorry but I only have one eye!” the truth is I’m determined to get better and learn to play without my vision effecting my game. And I know I can. I won’t be beaten. I know I can program my brain to process through only the one eye.

I’m committed to not just get better, but in the future be at a good enough standard where I can play at club level.

I will ensure I practice the basics of the game and master them. For now when I lose sight of the shuttle I’ll just say ‘oh dear’ and get on to the next rally. I’m going to look at other ways to bring my game to the next level, by improving my physical fitness and power, tactical and psychological strategies. I’m already watching loads of badminton videos to try and learn some new stuff.

Now I need to work on serving, and hit the shuttle when it comes back to my side of the net. This is going to be one long process but I will be patient and persevere!

For now I will play and enjoy. And ok in truth occasionally curse my eye..